Muscular effects of vitamin D in young athletes and non-athletes and in the elderly

Abstract

Muscles are major targets of vitamin D. Exposure of skeletal muscles to vitamin D induces the expression of multiple myogenic transcription factors enhancing muscle cell proliferation and differentiation. At the same time vitamin D suppresses the expression of myostatin, a negative regulator of muscle mass. Moreover, vitamin D increases the number of type II or fast twitch muscle cells and in particular that of type IIA cells, while its deficiency causes type IIA cell atrophy. Furthermore, vitamin D supplementation in young males with low vitamin D levels increases the percentage of type IIA fibers in muscles, causing an increase in muscular high power output. Vitamin D levels are strongly associated with exercise performance in athletes and physically active individuals. In the elderly and in adults below the age of 65, several studies have established a close association between vitamin D levels and neuromuscular coordination. The aim of this review is to appraise our current understanding of the significance of vitamin D on muscular performance in both older and frail individuals as well as in younger adults, athletes or non-athletes with regard to both ordinary everyday musculoskeletal tasks and peak athletic performance.

Keywords

Athletic performance, Bone fractures, Muscle physiology, Physical activity, Rate of falls, Sarcopenia, Vitamin D 

 


Autor / Fonte:Nikolaos E Koundourakis, Pavlina D Avgoustinaki, Niki Malliaraki, Andrew N Margioris Hormones: International Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism 2016, 15 (4): 471-488
Link: http://www.hormones.gr/pdf/Hormones_15_471.pdf