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Notícias

The wrong first step to revive athletes in cardiac arrest
New research suggests that the main obstacle to an appropriate bystander response during athletes´ cardiac arrest could be an apparently widespread myth: that `tongue swallowing´ is a common complication of sudden loss of consciousness that must be avoided or relieved at all costs to prevent death from asphyxia. 

Notícias

O Simpósio de Saúde e Dança propõe reunir profissionais de diversas áreas para discutir e fomentar a saúde e a longevidade no trabalho artístico em dança.
Período: dia 28 de outubro de 2017 de 7:30 às18 horas
Local: Idea Casa de Cultura
Rua Bernardo Guimarães, 1.200 - Funcionários.Belo Horizonte - MG

Notícias

MULTIDISCIPLINAR: TROMBOSE VENOSA

Especialistas alertam para trombose venosa

Reunião Multidisciplinar, dia 21 de outubro (sábado), na sede da AMMG fala da principal causa prevenível da doença entre pessoas hospitalizadas

Notícias

Open-ended laboratory tests for cyclists could help athletes train better
Scientists have discovered that cyclists can perform better when they do not have to pace their efforts. Using 17 experienced male cyclists in a series of tests, they compared open-ended Time-To-Exhaustion (TTE) trials that are often used in laboratories with race-like Time-Trials to measure endurance performance. All of the cyclists were blinded to elapsed time, power output, cadence and heart rate. 

Notícias

US Olympians at 2016 Rio Games were infected with West Nile virus, not Zika
US Olympic and Paralympic athletes and staff who traveled to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, for the 2016 Summer Games did not become infected with Zika virus but did test positive for other tropical, mosquito-borne viral infections, including West Nile Virus, Dengue Fever and Chikungunya. 

Notícias

How much can watching hockey stress your heart?
A new study suggests that both the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat can have a substantial effect on the cardiovascular system. Investigators took the pulse of fans during a hockey game and found that on average, their heart rate increased by 75 percent when watching on TV, and by a whopping 110 percent (more than doubled, equivalent to the cardiac stress with vigorous exercise) when watching in person.